Start with Amen

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So be it.

That’s amen.

When you start a prayer with amen — so be it — you are saying that God is in control, and you’re agreeing with him that he will do what is best before the prayer even starts. That is not an easy posture, to admit that you’re not in control, but it is a beautiful form of worship. It shows trust that God has your ultimate good in mind, even if his will is not the easiest path to take. Honestly, it might not be the easy path — but he is up to something eternally good, even when we cannot seem to see it this side of heaven.

Amen “was the congregational response of affirmation or agreement in both Hebrew and Greek gatherings” in the Bible, the “expression of praise to the Lord,” and “the confirmation of a blessing,” according to Start with Amen by Beth Guckenberger (p. 189).

♥ Amen

When someone embraces this word and uses it with the solemnity it deserves, there is a sense of settle that follows. I accept. I affirm. I praise. I bless. It testifies in two syllables to the conviction that God’s way is best. We might not always understand his ways, and certainly we might not always like them, but we can always be confident of them.  (Start with Amen p.189)

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Lamentations 3:21

In Start with Amen, Beth Guckenberger quotes a staggering statistic that out of 2 billion children in the world today, 1 billion have been abused — assaulted physically, verbally, emotionally, or sexually. As an educator, I think about my own students when I hear this, and my heart breaks. I think about children in other countries who are orphans. My heart is stirred: what more can I do to share God’s love with those who have not felt it? Guckenberger also writes about the “orphan spirit” that shows up in believers, those who think they can somehow earn his love through works and those who lack spiritual confidence. In the book’s prologue, she writes:

As for me? I am to live and love like a daughter [of God], talk like a daughter. I am to invite and extend myself and risk . . . I am to root myself in his identity and not gorge myself on counterfeit affections. I am then to testify every chance I get: freedom is found in forfeiting my own way. Amen.

As I was reading this book, God spoke to me specifically and deeply. As I asked questions of Him, He answered and let me know that His presence was there. Acts 2:26 showed up twice in my day and felt significant both times. I saw the verse in A Homemade Year by Jerusalem Jackson Greer (a neat book, I might add) and then again in Start with Amen. God seemed to be telling me to pay attention to it.

Acts 2:26 (The Message)

I’ve pitched my tent in the land of hope.

I had a surgery on my leg over a week ago, and I am having some type of very bad post-surgery allergic reaction that the doctor has never seen before. It looks like I have burns and welts all over my leg. I am praying, and I know others are praying for me too. I feel like I am in a land of unknowns right now, and obviously it is not an easy thing to go through. I wanted to be outside with my son, enjoying this beautiful time of the year instead of in a place full of unknowns. I know I am not in control of this situation, but I am trusting that God will take care of me (amen♥). I started reading Start with Amen the day after my surgery. It is challenging me and comforting me at the same time.

xoxo Teresa

*I received Start with Amen from Book Look Bloggers in return for my honest review. I found the photo at the top of my post here (not an affiliate link).

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6 thoughts on “Start with Amen

  1. It’s not easy when we feel we’re not in control of a situation, but this is a good reminder that we should come to God submitting to his will and handing over the control to him, trusting that he knows what he’s doing. Visiting from Tell His Story.

  2. Sorry you are having post surgery complications…so not fun! Great post. Did you know amen also means “let it be so?” Blessed to be your neighbor at Tell His Story this week!

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